Sunburn SOS: 7 tips to soothe your sun-damaged skin, according to a wellness expert


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With the arrival of summer comes more time spent outdoors, which can increase the risk of sunburn.

More than one out of every three adults experienced a sunburn last year, according to a survey by the American Academy of Dermatology.

If not treated properly, sunburn can lead to severe skin damage and increase the risk of skin cancer, experts warn.

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Angela Rosoff, a San Francisco-based wellness and beauty expert at the face yoga app Luvly, shared the following seven main remedies to treat sun-damaged skin.

1. Soak the pain away

“Should you spend a little too long in the sun, head inside and take a cold shower to wash away any skin irritants, such as chlorine or salt water,” Rosoff told Fox News Digital.

“While your skin is still damp, apply a moisturizer containing aloe vera directly to the burn, allow it to soak in, then seal it in with a layer of fast-absorbing jojoba oil,” an expert recommended. (iStock)

Next, she recommends filling a bath with eight to ten black tea bags — or a cup of oats — and waiting for the water to turn dark amber. 

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“With the water full of natural compounds known for reducing inflammation, a quick soak will make your skin feel better in no time,” she said. 

If that doesn’t work, she suggests trying green tea, matcha powder or rice water.

2. Moisturize constantly

“While your skin is still damp, apply a moisturizer containing aloe vera directly to the burn, allow it to soak in, then seal it in with a layer of fast-absorbing jojoba oil,” Rosoff said.

Aloe vera is packed full of water and anti-inflammatory compounds, making it a powerful remedy against the aches and pains of sunburn, the expert noted.

sunburned woman

More than one out of every three adults experienced a sunburn last year, according to a survey by the American Academy of Dermatology. (iStock)

“Keep a healthy stock in the fridge during the summer months, and reach for it whenever your skin gets hot, red or dry,” she advised.

“For the intimate areas that can’t be slathered in cream, such as your eyes or lips, don’t underestimate the soothing abilities of the humble cucumber slice.”

3. Ease the pain

At the first sign of sunburn, the best move is to take an anti-inflammatory pain medication, such as ibuprofen, according to Rosoff. 

“Treat your current suffering as a lesson learned.”

“Not only will it provide immediate relief, but it will help to reduce the swelling to aid your skin’s recovery.”

4. Stay hydrated

Sunburn often coincides with symptoms such as a dry mouth, fatigue or lightheadedness, according to Rosoff. 

“These are sure signs of dehydration, caused by moisture being drawn out of your body to treat the burns on your skin’s surface,” she told Fox News Digital. 

sunscreen

It’s important to protect the skin every time you go outside, incorporating a high-SPF sunscreen moisturizer into your daily skincare routine. (iStock)

“A supply of ice-cold water and the occasional sports drink will help to rehydrate the body and replenish electrolytes, easing your symptoms and speeding up recovery.”

5. Keep cool

Sweating can make sunburn unbearable, so it can be helpful to throw open the windows and doors and let cool air flood the room. 

“Wear loose, breathable clothing made from cotton, linen or silk to let your skin breathe,” Rosoff recommended. 

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If you have access to air conditioning, she advised switching it to the coldest setting and pointing it directly at the burned area for extra relief.

“If it’s too hot inside, you might be tempted to sit out in the open air, but don’t,” she advised. “Even if you’re in the shade, the slightest bit of sun exposure will set your recovery back.”

6. Avoid peeling and popping

“Your skin is bound to blister and peel — it’s your body’s way of keeping the healthy skin underneath hydrated while it rids itself of the damaged cells,” Rosoff said. 

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“It’s essentially your own natural healing system — so, as uncomfortable as it is, you need to let your body get on with the job.”

air conditioner

If you have access to air conditioning, an expert advised switching it to the coldest setting and pointing it directly at the burned area for extra relief. (iStock)

Popping the blisters will only make the recovery more painful and expose your body to all sorts of harmful bacteria, the expert warned.

7. Protect yourself

“Too much exposure can leave you with far worse things to worry about than burns and blisters,” Rosoff warned. 

“Repeat sun damage can have irreversible ill effects on our skin, causing it to separate from the body’s tissue and sag, and our health, causing skin cancer.”

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It’s important to protect the skin every time you go outside, incorporating a high-SPF sunscreen moisturizer into your daily skincare routine and wearing clothing that guards against UV rays, Rosoff recommended.

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“Treat your current suffering as a lesson learned.”



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